A Criminology Theory Approach to Global Drug Counterfeiting

Criminology Theory pic

Criminology Theory
Image: trails.asanet.org

Nicholas Janitsary is a global security consultant who guides New Dimension Group as managing director and provides a host of services ranging from intelligence gathering to critical crisis management. In providing client-driven training solutions, Nicholas Janitsary draws on a doctoral background in criminology.

This discipline has a wide range of applications, with recent Michigan State University research published in the Journal of Forensic Science and Criminology pointing to criminology theory as a foundation for addressing medication fraud. A number of developing world countries have set in place rapid response and intervention protocol for addressing the production and distribution of drugs that are fake and substandard. Unfortunately, this alone has proved insufficient in protecting people from the impacts of drug counterfeiting.

In conceptualizing the issue, the MSU researchers applied crime triangle theory, which links the potential for successful fraud to lack of enforcement and the presence of a victim. Effective countermeasures must take a coordinated approach in shrinking the triangle size.

This goes beyond reacting to existing problems and involves proactively seeking to understand the underlying dynamics that allow them to arise. Only when key pressure points are identified can they be removed from the equation; preventing medication fraud and counterfeiting in countries such as India and Nigeria has been described as comparable to treating a patient with a chronic condition.